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Category Archives: Training

It’s All Semantics

How often have you visited a climbing forum and stumbled upon an endless debate over some trivial matter like the definition of “is”?  It seems that many of us would rather argue about training terminology than actually train.  This pre-occupation with semantics can be a real distraction from the truly important matters (like the phone number for Rock and Resole), and yet, some questions come up again and again:

  • What is the real definition of “power”?  The physics definition doesn’t seem to fit the physiology definition–which is correct?
  • Are isometric contractions really isometric?
  • Is campus training “truly plyometric”?  

Many of us (myself included) have fallen victim to this mentality in the past.  Maybe the problem is that proper climbing training requires so much recovery and down-time that all us training fiends have nothing better to do than argue about this nonsense :)

Castle Valley, Utah

This photo won’t make you a better climber, but it sure is nice to look at.  Castle Valley, Utah, Photo Mike Anderson.

Regardless, the answer to all these questions and many others is a resounding: WHO CARES!?  None of these things have any bearing on the practical matter of how you should train!  When consider such questions, only one thing matters:  will doing [suggested training activity] make me a better climber?  No amount of arguing grammar, spelling, syntax or word use will make you one bit better as a climber.  To improve, you need to do some work.  And no, I don’t mean the Physics definition of work (= Force x Distance).  I mean the good ol’ fashioned kind that predates even Sir Isaac Newton.

We all know what we mean when we talk about climbing power.  We all know that relative to a bicep curl, a dead hang is isometric, and it’s pretty darn close–definitely close enough–to what we do over and over again on the rock.  It doesn’t matter if campusing is “plyometric” or “gullichometric”.  “Plyometric” is a made up word used to describe an arbitrary category of exercise.  All that matters is that it works for climbers, and so you should do it! 

I like to say that sports physiology is a lot like religion.  We all agree on 98% of the dogma, but we fight endless crusades over the 2% we disagree on.  That is silly.  If you’re following any kind of training program, documenting your results, and making adjustments, you’re head and shoulders above the vast majority.  Don’t waste so much energy obsessing over which program is the best.  There is no single approach that is optimal for everybody.  Find something that works for you and tweak it as you learn more about how your body responds to training.  If you sit around waiting for armies of scientists to definitively prove which training method is ideal, you will never get anything done.  Your great-great-grandkids will be long dead before that happens.

The work being done by Sports Physiologists is certainly important, and it is certainly worth some attention.  New theories need to be tested, but there are just too many variables in climbing to expect exact transference of studies being done on athletes in the big money sports.  Anyway, it’s highly doubtful some Silver Bullet set/rep/rest protocol is going to turn you into Adam Ondra overnight.  Even if a study “proves” this or that (which never happens anyway), the “proven” method may still not work for you.  You will still need to try it out for yourself to see if it works for your body.  The vast majority of the time, things that really work have been used for decades by athletes in many sports.  These methods were discovered and refined by athletes themselves, through trial and error, not by a scientist toiling away in a lab.  If you want to find the secret to optimizing your training, get out to your gym and try something new!  Document your results and let us know how it goes.  That is the best way to discover new information, not reading Physiology Journals or arguing on internet forums.

Three cheers for Eva Lopez, Dave Mcleod, Doug Hunter, Eric Horst, Udo Neumann, Wolfgang Gullich, and Tony Yaniro!  Hooray for anybody who is out there trying new things and sharing their findings.  I like the Rock Prodigy program because it works for me.  I know that it works for many other people too, and it might work for you.  But there are other programs out there that work too.  That’s great!  Shop around if you like, try a few different things, and find something that works for you.  If you’re satisfied with the results, then stick with it, that’s awesome!  As long as you’re doing something pre-meditated and you’re tracking your efforts, you’re way ahead of the curve.

Optimizing Post Exercise Recovery

The following is a guest-post from Seiji Ishii, well known to readers of the RCTM forum as “Coach Seiji”.  Coach Seiji has an extensive background in Exercise Physiology, has coached world-class athletes in various sports, including stints working for Carmichael Training Systems and Ultrafit.  He currently trains professional supercross/motocross athletes and operates a CrossFit gym in Austin, TX. During his free time he’s working to revive his dormant rock climbing career.

Coach-Seiji-3-600x400.jpg

Coach Seiji

It is a well-known and researched practice by even recreational athletes to ingest protein directly after both endurance and strength training as it has repeatedly shown to aid in positive protein balance and thus stimulate protein synthesis.  This increases recovery rates and muscle adaptive response to each subsequent training bout, making training more efficient. Several research groups have and are still studying the optimal amount and type of protein. Reading studies related to this up to 2013 have shown that increasing the amount of protein ingested in a single dose post-exercise increases the amount of protein synthesis (up to 20g, at which point the rate of protein synthesis is maximized). Several types of protein have been studied, including dairy-based proteins like whey, casein and casein protein hydrolysate, as well as whole milk, fat free milk, and yes, even chocolate milk. Soy and egg protein have also been studied. I haven’t found that many studies comparing protein synthesis rates of the various kinds of proteins, but what has been shown is that milk protein and its isolates, whey and casein, perform better than soy.  Furthermore, whey seems to stimulate a larger protein synthesis response than casein. These differences arise from the differences in amino acid profile and digestion and absorption kinetics.

The timing of protein ingestion has also been studied; it has been shown that consuming protein right after training produces a better protein balance than waiting a few hours. It has also been shown that consuming carbohydrates with the protein further enhances muscle protein building due to the quicker delivery of amino acids to the muscle cells. Ingesting protein both before and during exercise has to stimulate muscle protein synthesis during the exercise bout.

Coach Seiji crushing at Sitting Bull Falls, NM.

Coach Seiji crushing at Sitting Bull Falls, NM.

All of this is good of course, but the surprising thing is that studies have shown that overnight muscle synthesis rates are not positively affected by post exercise protein intake, even when the training and subsequent protein supplementation ocurred in the evening. Muscle protein synthesis rates were even lower in the morning than with an overnight fast! Bummer!

I located a study that specifically addressed if protein administered during sleep affected protein synthesis rates compared to fasting overnight, then the same with ingesting protein just prior to sleeping.

Who:

Luc J.C. van Loon, researcher, and recreational athletes that performed a resistance training bout at 8pm.

What:

Protein supplementation both directly before sleep, and during sleep, and its effects on overnight muscle protein synthesis.

Why:

Athletes have ingested 20-25g of protein directly after training bouts as it has shown to increase muscle protein building in the crucial recovery period.  However, even if this happens in the evening, no positive effects have been shown on overnight muscle protein synthesis. This could be due to the slowing of digestion and other related processes that would reduce the amount of amino acids available in the plasma during sleep. Regardless of cause, this seemingly doesn’t take advantage of the most restorative time in the athlete’s 24-hour period. The purpose of this analysis is to find a way to take advantage of this time to optimize recovery and make training more efficient in the long term.

Where:

Department of Movement Sciences of Maastricht University of the Netherlands

When:

First published by the American College of Sports Medicine in 2012

How:

The first method studied was to supplement protein through a nasogastric tube (tube going in through the nose into the stomach) during sleep. The casein protein had a tracer on it both prior to ingestion, then again with a different tracer administered via IV drip throughout the night to track the protein once it entered the plasma.

The second method involved recreational athletes, who all ate nutritionally equally during the day, performed their strength training bout at 8 pm, and then ingested 20g protein/60g carbohydrate at 9 pm.  These subjects then ingested a recovery drink 30 minutes prior to sleep that contained either  40g of casein protein with tracer, or a placebo. Sleep time was standardized to 7.5 hours.

Results:

The protein delivered via feeding tube did increase muscle protein syntheisis rates overnight compared to no feeding overnight. The tracer proved that the casein protein was indeed digested, caused an increase in the concentration of amino acids in the plasma, and wound up in new muscle proteins by morning. The 40g protein drink given 30 min prior to sleep also increased amino acid concentration in plasma, increased protein synthesis rates compared to the drink that didn’t contain protein, and the tracer was found in the newly assembled muscle proteins in the morning.

The subjects that received the 40g protein recovery drink showed both reduced protein breakdown during the night, an average increase of 22% of protein synthesis for a much improved overall overnight protein balance during the 7.5 hours of sleep.

My take:

This is all good! Much better overnight muscle recovery with the ingestion of the 40g protein 30 min before sleep. This, to me, is an awesome benefit to daily recovery and long term effectiveness and efficiency of training, for very little effort.

My suggestion would be to do this after any strength training day and any heavy day of training. I would find the type or mixtures of proteins that work the best for you, both in terms of digestion and effects on your sleep. I do think that this varies depending on the person and I do think that what you eat before you sleep can affect your sleep (I am researching what types of proteins affect sleep in what way after reading this study), so you need to experiment to find what works best. I do think finding easily digestible protein matters, as digestion rates do slow during sleep. Easily digestible protein sources will create less work for your body during sleep, freeing up more energy to devote to other recovery tasks.  Also, the amount of work your body has to do to digest the protein can negatively affect sleep from what I have observed.

Bottom Line:

  • 20-25 g Protein with each meal
  • 20-25g Protein right after exercise
  • Can consider some Protein with Carbohydrate during exercise, but in most people I know and myself, protein during exercise can cause GI stress/GI slowdown thus negatively effecting hydration and carbohydrate fueling. This also seems worse as exercise intensity increases. In these cases, to me, it’s not worth the downsides at all for the upside of increased protein synthesis during the exercise bout.
  • 20-40g Protein right before bed, not to exceed 30 min prior to sleeping

Heck ya! Enjoy the benefits of increased muscle recovery while you sleep! It doesn’t get much easier than that.

If you are interested in  contributing to the RCTM Blog as a guest author, please contact us here!

Independence Day

In honor of our nation’s liberation from the tyrannical tax policies of King George*, we hope you take the opportunity to free something that was, for you at least, previously subjugated by the oppressive bonds of “A0”.

In other news, we have a bunch of random announcements to make.  First, if you haven’t already, please check out our Podcast Interview with Neely Quinn over on TrainingBeta.com.  We discuss a number of fascinating topics, including:

  • How we got into training
  • Our biggest accomplishments in climbing
  • How much we train, and how little YOU need to train
  • Balancing work, family, training and climbing
  • Training in Afghanistan
  • The best training tools, and who should use them
  • JStar’s training program
  • Running and climbing
  • Diet
  • How to polish off a long term project

If none of those topics interest you, you can make a fun 4th of July drinking game out of trying to guess which one of us is talking at any given point in the interview.

Second, the entire Anderson clan will be in Lander, Wyoming next weekend for the International Climber’s Festival.  If you’re in the area come say hello, or sign up for our clinic.  We will be at the Trade Fair Friday afternoon at City Park (look for the Trango tent), then at Wild Iris (the crag, not the shop) Saturday morning for the shoe demo and clinic.  You may also see us around the crags before or after the official events.  You’ve been warned :)

Keith North trying my new 13b-ish line Apoca-Lips Now.

Keith North trying my new 13b-ish jug haul Apoca-Lips Now.  Photo Mark Anderson

Finally, we’ve been climbing a fair bit over the last few weeks, uncommonly so.  I’ve been fortunate to help out with the development of a new eye-popping crag in Clear Creek Canyon.  This crag will be described in Kevin Capps’ upcoming Clear Creek guidebook, published by Fixed Pin, which should be available sometime this Fall**.  The crag is unusual for Clear Creek in that the routes are super steep, relatively juggy, and yet, quite continuous.  It reminds me a lot of the Arsenal (at Rifle).   The rock quality is “mixed”, to put it nicely, but the best rock is outstanding, reminiscent of the best quartzite at the Gunks.   If you’re willing to climb through short sections of flaky pegmatite there is some really fun climbing to be had.

Kevin Capps near the lip turn on Apoca-Lips Now.

Kevin Capps near the lip turn on Apoca-Lips Now. Thirty feet of horizontal climbing on mostly massive jugs! Photo Keith North.

Thanks to Keith North for providing a few of the photos.  You can check out more of his shots of this crag on his blog.

Figuring out the foot sequence before the FA of Full Metal Jacket, 5.13c.  Photo Keith North.

Figuring out the foot sequence before the FFA of Full Metal Jacket, 5.13c. Photo Keith North.

Video still of me on the FA of Valkyrie, 5.14a?

Video still of me on the FA of Valkyrie, 5.14a? The green fixed line is attached to the Valkyrie anchor, and is directly “behind” me, providing a good indication of the crag’s steepness.

*To our many readers residing in the UK or the other realms of George’s descendants, we say, “Solidarity brothers (and sisters)…and sisters! :)

**I don’t have the best track record when it comes to predicting publication dates

 

 

 

 

 

Trainer to the JStars: Part 2

This is part 2 in a two-part series about our experience (so far) training Pro Climber Jonathan Siegrist.  You can check out “Trainer to the JStars: Part 1″ here.

We had learned quite a bit the first time around, and by the end of his first cycle, Jonathan was training completely independently, though occasionally asking the odd question about this or that exercise, or schedule tweak. For his second cycle we knew he would need very little hands-on coaching, but we helped design his training schedule to ensure his performance peak would coincide with his spring climbing trip.  That timing can be very tricky to optimize, especially for athletes who are new to periodic training, and don’t have years of detailed training schedules to pull from.  Once we developed a good training schedule, he embraced the program whole-heartedly and required very little direction. That’s one of the reasons Jonathan is such a great athlete to work with. He’s not a robot, he wants to be in charge of his training. He questions everything and wants to know why we do things a certain way. It’s really been a collaboration, and we’ve all learned a tremendous amount as a result.

Quote5By mid-March, Jonathan had begun training for his spring objective: the world’s most legendary 5.15, Realization (aka Biographie), at the mega-crag Ceuse, in France. The route is long, climbing overhanging 2 and 3 finger pockets up a beautiful blue streak of limestone. Recently a hold broke on the opening boulder problem, raising the difficulty of this crimpy section from “V8” to “V11”. [Editor’s note: when Jonathan describes the grade of something, it’s often helpful to add a number or two to get an accurate sense of the difficulty.] This section was really difficult the last time Jonathan tried the route so we wanted to make sure his crimp strength was at its best. To optimize Jonathan’s chances, he would need improved power, excellent pocket strength, and elite fitness.

The Ceuse Massif.  Likely the best chunk of exposed limestone on the planet.

The Ceuse Massif. Likely the best chunk of exposed limestone on the planet. Photo Mark Anderson

Jonathan returned to Boulder at the end of March to focus on his training. He completed several weeks of hangboard training and supplemental exercises, with some indoor bouldering and route climbing mixed in. At the conclusion of his Strength Phase, he did a two-week Power Phase of Limit Bouldering and Campusing.

Jonathan filling out his logsheet during a winter  training session in Las Vegas.

Jonathan filling out his logsheet during a winter training session in Las Vegas.

Jonathan arrived in France in late April. The initial period was extremely exciting. We received weekly updates on his progress, moments of minor success, and various setbacks related to weather, departing partners, and skin. He made huge progress right off the bat.   He was crushing the initial boulder problem, and by his third day he was climbing into the redpoint crux.   Jonathan described this as a 7-move “V8” (ya right!), requiring accurate movement between intricate 3-finger pockets. This section would prove to be the key to the route.

Quote6By the end of the second week, he was climbing to the last move of this boulder problem, but his skin was seriously suffering. The weather was also extremely uncooperative. One of the cool things about training is that it provides you with a clear record of your improvement. Even if you’re unable to send your goal route (because the weather doesn’t cooperate, you can’t get partners, or some other factor you can’t control conspires against you), your training logs provide quantifiable evidence of your improvement. Still, we’d all prefer to send anyway!

Realization is located on the Sector Biographie, which is the tallest and steepest section of cliff near the center of the photo.

Realization is located on the Sector Biographie, which is the tallest and steepest section of cliff near the center of the photo.

At this point I would wake up anxiously every morning and run to my Gmail hoping to find a “just sent!” message from France. I was on pins and needles, following his Twitter feed, hoping for any update or hint of his progress. I wanted so badly for him to send after watching all the hard work he had put in, but I felt totally helpless. By the end of May you could sense his frustration with the project. He had gotten so close so quickly, and then everything seemed to turn against him. I knew he could do it if he stuck with it, but how long can someone persevere in the face of so much adversity, especially when they’re surrounded by lifetimes of world class routes to distract them from their goal?

Quote7As the calendar flipped to June, I gave up hope. I was actually pretty bummed about it. I felt like I had failed somehow, like I messed up the training plan in some way. Considering his initial success, it seemed in retrospect that he had peaked too early, and that was on me. I didn’t realize how harsh the weather would be when he first arrived, so I wanted him ready to crush from day one.

Then on the morning of June 2nd I opened my inbox and saw this: “Hey guys! I imagine you’ve seen, but I sent Biographie yesterday. It was a long and emotional ride – as I expected. In the end my skin was battered, but I was well rested. I honestly think that despite how terribly frustrating my skin issues were, that it was important to my success because I NEVER would have rested so much if my skin was good to go. Thanks so so much for all of your help over the last few months. I certainly owe a percentage of credit to you guys for the motivation and training advice – so thanks.” [You can get more details and Jonathan’s perspective on his ascent here and here.]

I was strangely euphoric for several days after. I feel like there are many pro climbers out there who just lucked into their success, either through amazing genetic gifts, parents who supported their climbing from an early age, or some mystery formula I haven’t figured out. Jonathan is not one of those guys. He works extremely hard. More than that, he searches for solutions. He leaves no stone unturned in his quest to improve. He uses his mind along with his muscles to make himself better. Watching him go through this transformation over the past eight months, watching him make sacrifices and give up things he loved (like running), I feel like he really earned this—he deserved it—and I was so happy to see him get the big payoff. Since his send, Jonathan has been on a rampage, sending a 14c/d, 14c, two 14bs, and two 14a’s (including a 14a flash). I’m sure there is more to come before he returns to the States in July.

As this initial phase of our collaboration comes to an end, Jonathan is poised to re-shape the American climbing scene. He’s still only just now learning how to get the most from his training. I’m certain he will be getting substantially stronger in the coming years, and it’s a tremendous honor to have played a minor part in that.

Note: If you haven’t already heard it, we highly recommend Jonathan’s Podcast interview with Neely Quinn on Trainingbeta.com. Jonathan talks extensively about his collaboration with us and the results of his new training approach. The podcast was the source of many of Jonathan’s quotes in this article.

*All quotes are from Jonathan’s personal correspondence, blog posts, and the interview with Neely Quinn.

 

Trainer to the JStars: Part 1 – New Post on RCTM.com!

Check out my new post on “Trainer to the JStars – Part 1″ over at RockClimbersTrainingManual.com:

“Over the past six months we’ve been extremely fortunate to have the opportunity to train one of America’s most accomplished sport climbers. I can say unequivocally that the experience has been one of the highlights of my varied climbing career. It’s every coach’s dream to work with the very best athletes within a given sport, and we are no different. While we have tremendous confidence in our program, and its long track-record of producing results for mortals like us, we’ve long ‘fantasized’ about recruiting an elite-level guinea pig for some next-level experimentation. Would it work for a top-level athlete? Can it be adapted to the full-time climbing schedule of a legit pro? There was only one way to find out, but we needed a strong climber with an open mind….”  Continue Reading

Trainer to the JStars: Part 1

Over the past six months we’ve been extremely fortunate to have the opportunity to train one of America’s most accomplished sport climbers. I can say unequivocally that the experience has been one of the highlights of my varied climbing career. It’s every coach’s dream to work with the very best athletes within a given sport, and we are no different. While we have tremendous confidence in our program, and its long track-record of producing results for mortals like us, we’ve long ‘fantasized’ about recruiting an elite-level guinea pig for some next-level experimentation. Would it work for a top-level athlete? Can it be adapted to the full-time climbing schedule of a legit pro? There was only one way to find out, but we needed a strong climber with an open mind.

Over the last summer, Mike ran into our mutual friend Jonathan Siegrist at Wild Iris. Jonathan’s work ethic is unparalleled, and his tick list speaks for itself (over 100 5.14 sends, multiple 5.14 flashes, and numerous 5.14c and d first ascents), but he’s also extremely intelligent and thoughtful. He respects our sport’s history, while pulling out all the stops to carve out a bigger and better future. He’s the kind of climber you can’t help but root for. The two discussed our upcoming book (which Jonathan graciously offered to review for the back cover) and Jonathan mentioned that he was looking to try a more structured approach to his already legendary training habits. Mike eagerly volunteered our services to help him develop a new training strategy.

Jonathan crushing Moonshine, 5.14d, at the Wild Iris last summer. Photo Mike Anderson.

Jonathan crushing Moonshine, 5.14d, at the Wild Iris last summer. Photo Mike Anderson.

Jonathan was the perfect candidate for the Lazy H Training Laboratory. When he’s committed, he’s unstoppable, but he also brings a healthy amount of skepticism to the table. He’s worked hard to get where he is, and he’s not inclined to risk his hard-earned fitness on the flavor of the month. He had been talking with various training gurus around the country, and after a sneak peak at our book, he felt our program might be the right approach for him.

In November the three of us finally got around to hatching a plan. I met with Jonathan at my home in Evergreen to discuss his goals, strengths, and weaknesses, and to develop a strategy. Jonathan lamented that he had basically been at the 5.14d-level for the past three years. Granted, it’s a grade most of us would be satisfied with, but the great ones are great precisely because they’re never satisfied. Prior to this, he had made pretty steady progress throughout his career. He had tried many different things but couldn’t seem to break through this plateau. He had some impressive goals on the horizon, and he was extremely determined to take his climbing to the next level in order to achieve them. He wanted to put himself into position to firmly establish the 5.15 grade in America. As we sat at my kitchen table, he summed up his motivation in a simple manner we can all relate to: “I want to send man! I’m not getting any younger.”

Quote2We talked about his normal climbing and training approach, reviewed some video of his recent achievements, and generally tried to create a general picture of where he was, and where he needed to go. With all the humility I can summon, I’d like to think I see a lot of myself in Jonathan’s climbing. He likes to flash the same styles of routes I like to project :) Ignoring magnitude, we have similar strengths and weaknesses. In that sense, I felt well-qualified to design a training plan he could use to deliver himself from Point A to Point B, but I had a significant fear. Jonathan was already one of the best climbers in the world, so clearly he was doing something right. The last thing I wanted to do was somehow make him worse (or cause an injury) by tinkering with his approach. You don’t just paint over the Mona Lisa and hope that you end up with something better.

The over-arching strategy was to improve Jonathan’s explosive power (from a physical standpoint) and aggressiveness, since these seemed to be the clear limiting factors in his climbing. We hoped to accomplish that in two primary ways. First, we wanted to drastically cut back Jonathan’s training volume to facilitate higher-intensity training. At that point, Jonathan was performing a super-human volume of climbing and training: “I learned to train very much in the vein of Tommy [Caldwell] — beat yourself up like crazy. Usually my training days would be doing 3-4 hours of routes or boulders in the gym in sets, then weight room for a series of opposition / finger board for an hour, then an hour run. I go on like this for 2 or 3 days in a row and then 1 day off completely. I rarely take more than 1 day off and I never take off a week, etc.” This was obviously a huge factor in his success as a climber—it gave him the ability to hang on forever, and it helped hone his technical skills. These strengths are evident in his climbing, and the routes he likes to climb. Clearly we didn’t want to sabotage those strengths, but something had to be done about his power, and you can’t train power effectively when you’re tired.

Quote3The second part of the plan was to mesh the Rock Prodigy program elements with Jonathan’s already-Herculean training schedule. Jonathan wanted to prepare primarily for a lifetime goal-route he hoped to try in late spring 2014, so we had time to complete two short training cycles. This was huge, as it gave us the flexibility to take some risks the first season, and then tweak the program in time to get the best results for the all-important spring season.

We skipped the Base Fitness Phase since that is the last thing Jonathan needs, but recommended a complete Strength and Power Phase. Jonathan’s finger strength was already quite good, but we really wanted to see if we could make some improvements in that area, and we felt that hangboarding provides really important preparation for the power training activities we wanted to emphasize later in the cycle. Jonathan took straight to the hangboard. He has an analytical mind, and a slightly sick love of suffering — traits that are well-suited to the hangboard.

“So dude. I was getting super frustrated because I felt like I was constantly slipping off the hang board and shit was getting so much harder even with perfect temps, so I took the board down and inspected to find that I've literally worn the texture off...”

“So dude. I was getting super frustrated because I felt like I was constantly slipping off the hang board and shit was getting so much harder even with perfect temps, so I took the board down and inspected to find that I’ve literally worn the texture off…”

We really wanted to emphasize Limit Bouldering and Campusing, especially aggressive, explosive movements on the wall. Jonathan is wicked strong with crazy lock-off strength, which allows him to do many hard moves statically, but that’s oftent not the most efficient way to do a hard move.   During our first meeting in November, I took him out to my barn and asked him to do an “explosive pull-up”. Despite cranking out numerous 1-arm pull-ups with each arm, he just couldn’t do an explosive pull-up. His muscles didn’t know how to contract quickly. He was super impressed to see me do a double dyno on the campus board with ease (after a few minutes of coaching, Jonathan was able to do one too). Our plan hinged on making some significant strides during the Power Phase, both in terms of contact strength and climbing style. We really wanted to get Jonathan swinging around and going for it on dynamic moves.

Since Jonathan is essentially a full-time pro, and not restricted to the Weekend Warrior approach, it was important that he get regular days outside to keep him sane and psyched. To that end, the Power Endurance Phase would be performed entirely outdoors on Jonathan’s Las Vegas-area projects. On a micro-scale, we prescribed a two-days-on/one-day off schedule in which he would train inside, per the RP method, on the first day on, and then climb outside on projects (or indoors on gym routes if the weather was no good) on day two. Occasionally he would go three days on, climbing outside the second and third days. This ensured he had a rest day before each training session, so he could really get after it with high intensity work.

Quote4One of the really cool and fun aspects of this experiment is being on the receiving end of Jonathan’s limitless psych. We would periodically receive random stoke emails with little blurbs like: “Dudes, I really think the training is working.”, “training works!”, “I’m super stoked! It’s definitely working. I’m really excited to imagine what I’ll feel like after finishing this”, and “…this shit works!” It’s always super cool and motivating to get one of these emails, but in my heart I’ve always been my own worst critic, and harbored significant anxieties about the results of our experiment. I was seriously anxious to see how things would work out once Jonathan returned to a serious project.

During the spring of 2013, Jonathan started trying a new, gob smacking project in Arrow Canyon. It took him a week that season just to work out the moves. After several weeks of work, the temperatures became unbearable, and so Jonathan moved on without a redpoint. After about six weeks on our program, we were all excited to see how The Arrow Canyon project would go when he returned in January 2014. We were all a bit surprised by the initial results. On only his fourth day back on the project, La Lune was born: “In some ways it was strange to work myself up. I just thought it was going to be such a big battle, and then I came back and, it’s all relative, but it felt quite easy compared to the way that I was climbing on it and the way that I felt about it last year… It was very clear to me almost immediately that the training had worked, and I was climbing at a higher level than I had last year.”

Jonathan's masterpiece La Lune climbs the right side of the arching cave.

Jonathan’s masterpiece La Lune climbs the right side of the arching cave.

Jonathan went on to polish off several other Vegas area routes, including completing the FA of Spectrum at The Promised Land. Then it was time to get back into training mode, and prepare for his primary goal of 2014. It was pretty rad to see Jonathan crushing on routes that were really pushing him the year before. That said, Jonathan asked for our help because he wanted to get to a new level, and we hadn’t achieved that yet….

Check back next week for “Trainer to the JStars: Part 2″

Note: If you haven’t already heard it, we highly recommend Jonathan’s Podcast interview with Neely Quinn on Trainingbeta.com. Jonathan talks extensively about his collaboration with us and the results of his new training approach. The podcast was the source of many of Jonathan’s quotes in this article.

*All quotes are from Jonathan’s personal correspondence, blog posts, and the interview with Neely Quinn.

 

Lander Days – New Post on RCTM.com!

Check out Mike’s new post on “Lander Days” over at RockClimbersTrainingManual.com:

“The family and I just got back from a great week in Lander. If you’ve never been, Lander is a throw-back; it’s a small community at the foot of the Wind River mountain range in Wyoming, so the pace of life is a little slower, and life is a bit simpler. When we’re in Lander, for whatever reason, there is no TV watching or any of those distractions. Instead, we’re outside a lot, and we spend time with great friends. On this trip we were fortunate to stay with Steve and Ellen Bechtel, and BJ and Emily Tilden. Thanks for the hospitality!  When we first arrived, I was in the midst of my Power phase, so I sought out powerful routes to supplement my training. That’s a big reason we were in Lander in the first place, to climb at the Wild Iris…..”  Continue Reading

Lander Days

Typical June weather at Wild Iris, but it's always temporary.

Typical June weather at Wild Iris, but it’s always temporary.

The family and I just got back from a great week in Lander. If you’ve never been, Lander is a throw-back; it’s a small community at the foot of the Wind River mountain range in Wyoming, so the pace of life is a little slower, and life is a bit simpler. When we’re in Lander, for whatever reason, there is no TV watching or any of those distractions. Instead, we’re outside a lot, and we spend time with great friends. On this trip we were fortunate to stay with Steve and Ellen Bechtel, and BJ and Emily Tilden. Thanks for the hospitality!

Lucas's favorite time of the day...heading home!

Lucas’s favorite time of the day…heading home!

When we first arrived, I was in the midst of my Power phase, so I sought out powerful routes to supplement my training. That’s a big reason we were in Lander in the first place, to climb at the Wild Iris. I think there are only a few crags in the US that are suitable for honest-to-goodness training on rock, and Wild Iris is one of them, when it comes to Power (The Red is great for endurance training). Also, early in your season, it’s a great idea to get some easier (for you) routes under your belt to get the rust off, and build confidence going into more difficult projects. To that end, I picked out a couple 13+ routes to try to tick off quickly. The first was Adi-Goddang-Yos, a short, powerful 13c at Rising from the Planes wall, made famous in Eric Perlman’s epic film, Masters of Stone. A hold had broken since the filming, but the route had been re-climbed at least twice since then, at a slightly harder grade. It now requires a pull off a small crimp (my specialty :) ), followed by a very powerful undercling move. I was fortunate to send on my second burn, and was able to play around on some harder routes for the future.

I was lucky to be the first person in the Western Hemisphere to try the super hot Tenaya Terifa, an aggressive high performance shoe that will excel on steep terrain. It has a chiseled toe that is great for pockets. I also like that it is a lace up because I can get on a tighter fitting shoe and still get it on over my grotesquely oversized heels.

I was lucky to be the first person in the Western Hemisphere to try the super hot Tenaya Tarifa, an aggressive high performance shoe that will excel on steep terrain. It has a chiseled toe that is great for pockets. I also like that it is a lace up because I can get on a tighter fitting shoe and still get it on over my grotesquely oversized heels.

My next climbing day, I targeted White Buffalo, a short crimping test-piece on a 30 foot boulder in the campground. You probably remember Mark’s account of this route from last fall: Roped Bouldering in Cowboy Country

I had been intrigued by this line for years (as I’m sure everyone who’s ever camped at the Iris is too), and finally had the opportunity to try it with the right fitness and good weather. We got an 0500 start in Lander to ensure good conditions, and an opportunity to get a couple burns before the sun warmed the face too much (it gets morning sun).

The day before I had just watched BJ Tilden trying his latest sick project at Wolf Point (see below). It was incredibly inspiring. He hasn’t sent yet, but on that attempt you could tell he was really going for it 100% on every move, even though the moves were really risky, low-percentage dynos to small one and two-finger pockets. There were probably five separate occasions when the crowd was sure he was falling, but he hung on and kept moving! It was quite an example.

BJ Tilden on his super-sick Wolf Point project. This think might be 9a+!

I think we all aspire to “climb like Sharma”, really going for it on every move, no matter how desparate.  Sometimes we pull this off in the gym, but for whatever reason many of us seem to hold back when we’re on rock.  Perhaps its the sharpness of the rock, fear of incurring a skin injury (or a real injury), or just fear of falling or failing.  Further complicating this is that certain types of climbing, like long enduro routes or technical on sights, punish over-gripping, and so foster a “don’t try too hard” mentality that can be difficult to overcome when we switch climbing styles.  While the RCTM advocates a “Smarter, not Harder” approach, we all need to remember that often the great climbers are great because they really do try harder than everyone else.  Just trying hard in the moment of the redpoint will not make the difference between climbing 13d and 14d, but all the opportunities along the way, over many, many years, of trying just a little bit harder in the gym, on the campus board, every time you’re on the rock, can eventually add up to that difference.  While Mark and I are not always brawlers on the rock, we are in the gym, and we try extremely hard in training, day-in, day-out, which is one of the reasons we’ve had success with our training.  And though we aren’t at BJ’s level, when the moment is right, we are able to whip out some pretty concerted efforts on a rope every now and then (just yesterday I belayed Mark on the send of his newest Clear Creak 5.14, and it was pretty cool to see him dynoing five times in a row, between insecure holds, eight feet above the last bolt, especially since I was around in the early days when he was much more timid).

So, when I got to White Buffalo, which has some painful and powerful crimp moves, I channeled my inner-BJ…I wasn’t going to pace myself, just give 100% effort on every move, ignore the pain, or thoughts of failure and just try like hell! It worked, and I sent on my second go. It’s the first 13d-in-a-day I’ve done, and my first 2nd try. I’ve done a few in 3 tries, so this was a minor break through. More importantly, I had some confidence to head into some harder projects.

I’ll let my photos do most of the rest of the talking….

America's latest Super-Crag, Wolf Point.  This was my spring goal, that I had been dreaming of and training for for months.  Finally made it!

America’s latest Super-Crag, Wolf Point. This was my spring goal, that I had been dreaming of and training for for months. Finally made it!

I decided to try a beautiful 14a that BJ had put up called King Thing. It’s a commanding line, on a flawless sweep of limestone up the center of the cave. The moves are outstanding, without a stopper crux, but no opportunity to shake in the first 50 feet or so. You can watch BJ climbing it at about the 48 min point of this film, Wind and Rattlesnakes.

 

Steve Bechtel climbing on Remus, 13b.

Steve Bechtel climbing on Remus, 13b.

One of the best parts of the trip was making a couple new friends. First was Rob Jensen, shown below. It turns out, I grew up about 45 minutes from him (he’s from Springfield, Oregon), and we lived in Colorado at similar times, yet I’d never met him. He is also another proud owner of an Ascent Rock mechanized climbing wall, so we had much to talk about. He is a pillar of the Las Vegas climbing community, and hosts numerous climbers in his “garage” for epic training sessions.

Las Vegas climber, and all-around awesome dude, Rob Jensen climbing "Dominant Species" 5.11d.  That's Red Canyon in the background.

Las Vegas climber, and all-around awesome dude, Rob Jensen climbing “Dominant Species” 5.11d. That’s Red Canyon in the background.

I also met and climbed with Kyle Vassilopous. He moved to Lander last year from Bozeman, MT, and he is super-psyched to put up new routes. He was a pleasure to climb with because he is extremely psyched, and didn’t balk at my desire to start early for good temps!

Recent Lander transplant Kyle Vassilopolous warming up at Wolf Point.

Recent Lander transplant Kyle Vassilopolous warming up at Wolf Point.

Dr Tom Rangitsch has been the driving force behind new route development in Lander the last few years. He’s hiked more cliffline than anyone in town and discovered lots of new crags. He put up many of the best routes at Wolf Point, including this new addition, Full Moon, 5.13b, a 40 meter pitch that overhangs about 6 meters over the length. It started as a 30 meter 12c called Bark at the Moon, and this is an extension to that route. The first anchor is at the first draw visible in the photo. In this picture, he’s at the crux of the extension which is a really cool sequence on small crimps. I was lucky to get to belay him on the FA, then he belayed me a couple days later when I tried it. I wanted to go for an on-sight, and Tom did a great job of biting his lip as I flubbed the beta…luckily I was able to recover, and made the first on-sight of the route. It’s a great route Tom, thanks for the hard work!!!

Dr. Tom Rangitsch going for the FA of Full Moon, 5.13b.

Dr. Tom Rangitsch going for the FA of Full Moon, 5.13b.

Thanks everyone for the hospitality, we’ll be back soon to finish off our projects!

Unfinished Business Part 1 – New Post on RCTM.com!

Check out my new post on “Unfinished Business – Part 1″ over at RockClimbersTrainingManual.com:

“In 2011, Denver climbing activist, king of psyche and all-around great guy Luke Childers bolted a stunning arête at The Armory, a compact crag at the top of Clear Creek Canyon.  Clear Creek is quickly becoming the epicenter of sport climbing on the Colorado Front Range, largely thanks to guys like Luke who have a knack for finding great new lines on supposedly tapped out cliffs.  After finishing off American Mustang at the end of March, I had a few more climbing days to spare before beginning my summer training cycle.  I was really psyched to check out Luke’s Armory arête, which looked to me like the best unclimbed line in Clear Creek . I was stoked when Luke generously encouraged me to have at it….”  Continue Reading

Bouldering Circuits: A Quickie Power Endurance Workout

 Thanks to a loving husband and a (for the most part) cooperative baby, I’ve been able to consistently get to the gym 2-3 times per week starting around 2 weeks postpartum.  But when I go and how much time I have is always up in the air.  Sometimes I know up front that I only have 45 minutes to acquire a good pump…other times I go in thinking I have an hour and a half, only to have my workout cut short by a screaming baby.  If efficiency was an important component to my climbing workouts with just one kiddo,…Read the rest of this entry →

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